House of Air - Places For Kids

House of Air

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INFORMATION

926 Old Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94129


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Phone
(415) 345-9675
Hours
10 am – 9 pm (Mon – Thurs)
10 am – 10 pm (Fri – Sat)
10 am – 8 pm (Sun)
Tickets

$16 per session
10% off 10-session pack
15% off 20-session Value Pack

Membership
N/A
Website

PHOTOS

DESCRIPTION FOR House of Air

Just hearing the words “Trampoline Park” and “Bounce House” may make your kids start – literally – bouncing off the walls. Why not dress them up in Lycra and bring them to the House of Air so they can get all that energy out without damaging the house?
 
This isn't just one of those places with one trampoline and one bounce house, and a bunch of bored kids asking when they can go home. First, you have to find the right place in Presidio near Crissy Field Avenue, and NOT get distracted by going to Mason and California street (GPS can get confused). Second, you don't want to show up on a weekend without a reservation, because even though it's not a black tie affair...

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TIPS FOR VISITING House of Air

1. Signed Waiver: Required.

2. Trip planning: Parking costs $1 per hour or $6 per day at pay stations. Arrive 30 minutes early to find free parking on the south side of the House of Air or Planet Granite, or to the east or north of Le Petite Baleen. The PresidiGo shuttle is free, and the Stillwell Hall stop gets you within walking distance.

3. Socks can be purchased for $2 if you don't want to share foot germs but forgot your own.

4. Free lockers on the main floor, or paid lockers in the locker room.

5. Showers: 3 each for men and women.

6. House of Snacks: Between 10 am to 7 pm, there's a mix of healthy (coconut water and granola) and unhealthy (Red Bull,...

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BIRTHDAY PARTY AT House of Air

Request Form: http://houseofair.force.com/EventForm

Time: Between 1 to 2.5 Hours

Party price: $19 - $40 per person

Included: Party Table or Event Room, 30,000 feet of trampolines and floor space, Cleanup

Themes: Junior Bounce, Junior Geronimo, Top Gun, Air Force One, First Class, Puddle Jumper

Membership: N/A

Website Link: www.houseofair.com/events/birthdays/

Customizable: Yes

Bring Your Own: Drinks and Desserts

Sure, the House of Air is all about room to bounce off the walls and slide down chutes, and the birthday parties are no exception. There's plenty of room for options. You can have a private instructor show your group the trampoline ropes (Top Gun), get a party table for parents while the kids do trampoline free-for-all (Puddle Jumper and First Class), or nab a private room...

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REVIEWS FOR House of Air

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