California Academy of Sciences - Places For Kids

California Academy of Sciences

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INFORMATION

55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118


Get Directions

Phone
(415) 379-8000
Hours
 9:30 am – 5:00 pm (Mon – Sat)
11:00 am – 5:00 pm (Sun)
Close: Thanksgiving and Christmas
Tickets

FREE – Child 3 yr and under
$34.95 – Adults
$24.95 – Youth (4 yr -11 yr)
$29.95 – Student (12 yr -17 yr)
$29.95 – Senior 18 yr + (ID Required)
$29.95 – 65 yr + (ID Required )

Membership
Click here for more information
Website

PHOTOS

DESCRIPTION FOR California Academy of Sciences

While kids may never get excited about the periodic table of the elements or fulcrum formulas, they will get excited about science at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. At a certain age, kids need to explore important questions about life on Earth. The Academy of Sciences is a hands-on place for parents and kids to figure out how things work – and why.
 
Spread out over 400,000 square feet, the Academy's three major attractions (aquarium, planetarium, and natural history museum) show great examples of the planet's natural resources, from the water reclamation system to the solar-powered 'Living Roof' with 2 acres of plant species. Animal-loving kids can see the past and the future, from the Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton, to the tropical rain...

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TIPS FOR VISITING California Academy of Sciences

​1. Closing days: Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

2. Trip planning: Residents, bring your Muni pass, or military ID, for an extra discount. Out-of-towners, buy a CityPass ($84 for adults, $59 for a child) and compare the Academy to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, after taking a Bay Cruise or seeing Fisherman's Wharf.

3. Preview: On Quarterly Free Sunday days, the Academy is open to the public.

4. Gourmet food: From the Academy Cafe (gumbo, spring rolls, vegetarian salads,) to lunch at the Moss Room (butternut squash ravioli, flank steak), this is no amusement park fare. Food is kind of pricy but at least is tasty. You can bring your own food if you don’t want to wait in long line or spend the money. There are tables and chairs...

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BIRTHDAY PARTY AT California Academy of Sciences

Telephone: (415) 374-5854

Email: SpecialtyTours@calacademy.org

Time: 1.5 Hours between 10 am – 11:30 am, or 3:30 – 5 pm Party price: $500

Included: Facility Admission, Private 1-hour tour, 30-minute Snack Time (cupcakes, fruit, drinks), VIP access to Rainforests of the World and Earthquake Simulator, Planetarium Seats, Birthday Gift Themes: Aquarium Adventure, Reefs to Rainforest Membership: Reduces price by $100 ($400 total)

Website Link: www.calacademy.org/plan-an-event

Customizable: Yes

Bring Your Own: Water bottles and Removable Layers (for humid Rainforest)

This kind of birthday party may seem a little limited, since it's based around the tours that only accommodate up to 14 people, and the kids have to be at least 5 years old. Also, weekend parking can get stressful, so the Academy recommends carpooling or taking public transport....

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REVIEWS FOR California Academy of Sciences

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